Din Tai Fung

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The better half had meetings all day an so I thought i would meet him in town for lunch.  We ended up at Din Tai Fung – a specialty chinese restaurant that churns out little parcels of luscious pork dumplings. Here’s what the restaurant says;

Michelin star awarded and ranked as one of the world’s Top Ten Best Restaurants by The New York Times, Din Tai Fung has its roots dating back to Taiwan 40 years ago.

With its famous signature xiao long baos (steamed pork dumplings) and heart-warming steamed chicken soup, this authentic Taiwanese restaurant has been making waves with branches throughout the world, including Singapore, Thailand, Australia, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, and USA.

Ive been here before so I knew what to expect – the better half loved it when he tried it, so I was really happy.  Its really cheap for what it is as well – I would definitely recommend this restaurant to everyone visiting Singapore.  Here’s some of the pictures I took:

Ginger

Ginger

The better half ordered hot and sour soup

The better half ordered hot and sour soup

I was not impressed with the hot and sour soup as it was neither hot nor sour – it was too peppery for both our likings.

Egg fried rice

Egg fried rice

Stir-fried Dou Miao with Garlic

Stir-fried Dou Miao with Garlic

A deceptively simple dish made with only premium young, tender shoots. Every batch of specially selected vegetables is almost identical in length and quality, and is cut with precision before being tossed in the wok with just a teaspoon of sunflower oil.

Steamed Chilli Crab and Pork Buns

Steamed Chilli Crab and Pork Buns

The national favourite, chunks of chilli crab is mixed with fresh pork and packed into a steaming hot bun. A savoury gravy-filled treat with a touch of heat.

Steamed Pork Buns

Steamed Pork Buns

Pork Xiao Long Bau

Pork Xiao Long Bau

The food is served very quickly – and always served piping hot.  The only thing I would say is that the staff was not as friendly as they could have been – I wonder if the language was a barrier. As neither me not the better half spoke mandarin – although the better half tries to (and embarrasses me in the process!) Obviously, there are translations on the menu in english, but woe betide if you wanted to questions something about a particular dish. My advice? Look for a Chinese speaker who speaks both languages who will be happy to help – don’t worry, all Singaporeans are muchos friendly-ous (very friendly – sorry my made up Spanish is terrible)

KimmyX

 

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